New kiln test fired

Now that spring is really here and life gets in the way of art glass, my new kiln is ready to fire. My plan is to use it for thicker sculptures that take a long time to anneal. In the mean time I have been creating some flatter pieces such as the one below made with glass powder wafers. I love the texture achieved when I fused my diatom wafers to the background glass. I call this piece “Bones.” I mounted the glass on an aluminum frame, and it is 20″ x 16″ x 1″.

Bones

Bones

Finally, my new kiln and new lid arrived

Thanks to my wonderful son in law, the new lid is now on my old Ovation 10 kiln, and finally I can fuse again without fear of ceiling chips and element pins landing on my glass. I wish I had thought of purchasing a new lid two years ago instead of complaining and procrastinating for so long. I also got a new Pearl 22 kiln that needs to be installed – new power line.

Controlling Glass Flow Workshop

Last spring I watched the Bullseyeglass online video entitled, “Harnessing Flow in Kiln-Glass.” OMG! I was hooked on trying it, and with each experiment, I couldn’t wait to try another variation. Please check out the “Flow Glass Art” page in my Gallery. My favorite piece to date is “Chasm” (shown below), and I received a lot of positive comments about it .

Chasm

Chasm [sold]

All year I have been showing my work to Suzie Geyer at Carolina Stained Glass, and she asked me if I would like to teach a workshop at the shop this winter. So, yesterday we had a fun day there teaching 7 students to make their own flow project. Everyone had a blast, and we are all looking forward to the kiln opening on Monday. Here’s a piece I fused last week to show the class what it looks like before and after fusing and to demonstrate the movement of copper foil fish in different parts of the project. It still needs a lot of cold working and finishing.
Fishy Flow before fuse

Fishy Flow before fuse

Fishy Flow

Fishy Flow

Fishy Flow Back side

Fishy Flow Back side

Exhibit at NCSU Craft Center

An exhibit about NC Craftsmen is showing now at the NCSU Craft Center until March 28. I have 3 fused glass pieces in this show including the orange green vitrigraph rod plate shown here. There will be a panel discussion about the importance of craft at the Craft Center on the evening of February 26. I will have more info closer to the date.OrangeGreenPlatesm

Happy Holidays Everyone!

All my big exhibits and sales are finished for the year. The Carolina Designer Craftsmen Fair was a success and a lot of fun. I have done it for a few years, and I’m getting to know some of the other artists there. Now I am working on cleaning up my studio. I am looking forward to installing a new kiln soon as well as repairing the lid on my old one. Here are images of the two vitrigraph rod plates I finally finished just before the fair. The blue/green one sold on the first night of the fair.Bluegreenplatesm

sunsetgreenplatesm

Making a vitrigraph rod

My fellow glass artist friend Melanie Stoer is showing me how to create a vitrigraph rod. In the suspended kiln that we call a vitrigraph kiln is a flower pot with colored molten glass that has the consistency of molasses. The molten glass slowly flows down through the hole in the bottom of the flower pot, which is aligned over a hole in the bottom of the kiln. The glass hardens with exposure to room temperature and we cut off the rods and let them cool. After cooling, these rods can then be cut into small pieces. The cross sections look like Italian murrini and can be used in other fusing projects. When I finish the plate that I’m working on with these pieces, I will show you what it looks like.

Making a vitrigraph rod

Making a vitrigraph rod

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